Zoom Zoom

–originally from my old blog and recovered —

Hey all, it’s a Manga Studio tip week!

Let’s talk zoom levels. Like most drawing programs you can arbitrarily zoom in on MS pages to whatever zoom level you like, but if you use the little Magnifying plus and minus icons (zoom-magor the keyboard shortcut: – and + ) MS will jump to fixed zoom levels, which, handily you can set yourself.

Here’s my setup:

canvas-zooms

This can be found in MANGA STUDIO->Preferences->Canvas

A little explanation – I work at original art size, about 40% bigger than print – I do this because I still like working on traditional pencils/inks sometimes and so if I keep my digital file sizes the same size as my actual art I can round-robin pages – scanning in to alter pencils, print out, ink, scan in again with ease. Working all digital you could easily work at 600dpi print size, and I sometimes do that, but I’m used to drawing at the larger size now.

Here’s how the zoom levels breakdown – now these apply specifically to my 27″ cintiq (I KNOW!!!) and you should probably measure sizes out based on the screen resolution you’re working with:

5% – this is a tiny thumbnail of the page and gives me a quick distant glance at a page to make sure it’s working small (more important than most realise, if it works at this level it’ll work at all levels)

12.9% – this is roughly print size (I measured it against the finished comic) and gives me a sense of how it’ll work in print.

18.3% – is art 1:1 size on my old cintiq 12″ (which had a higher resolution than the 27″ cintiq). I could literally lay the art on top of the cintiq and it would match line for line.

20.8% – this is art 1:1 size on the new Cintiq 27″ (and why you should check your resolution to make sure it matches – you can do this using “Display Resolution” which lets you tell MS the res of your monitor by displaying a handle adjustable ruler which you set can measure against an actual real physical ruler- you’ll feel like a prat for a minute but once done it’s done)

display-settings.PNG

After this the sizes are mostly arbitrary:

33.3% – 1/3 zoom level. What I ink at most of the time, a little closer than 1:1

50% – occasionally go in to this detail if there’s some odd little detail I want to work out.

75% – this is too close to zoom, don’t do this (unless you’re flatting and need to make sure you’re not missing a bit)

100% – THIS WAY LIES MADNESS. Seriously, don’t ink at this level, that’s insane, bro.

And that’s how to set the perfect zoom levels (and not to worry, you can still zoom in using either the little slider on the navigation window to zoom in to insane arbitrary zooms if you so wish, but this way you can keep some bad habits away – like inking faces at 300% zoom, you maniac!)

Clip Studio Paint The Basics

A few years ago I wrote a bunch of articles for imagineFX called “Core Skills” for Clip Studio Paint. It’s probably time to revisit those in a new series of articles I’ll be doing for the blog called CSP The Basics.

These are things I think you’ll need to have a handle on using clip studio. It won’t replace a manual or a decent book, or any number of other resources. It’ll just be the way I work in the software for producing my own work. CSP – like any sofware often has more than one way to go about doing anything, and so, there’s a chance that I’ll introduce you to some other way of doing stuff or you’ll think “that’s not how you do that!”

Anyway, one article a week is the aim, we’ll see how it gets done.

The basics will be:

  1. File->New! Everything you need to know about creating a brand new file in CSP.
  2. Layers of meaning. WTF is a layer and why do I need to know what that is.
  3. File->Print. Digital pencilling in CSP.
  4. Basic 3d in CSP.
  5. Export. Exporting preview images for fun and (no) profit!
  6. Paint it Black. Digital inks.
  7. Lettering and why you should avoid it in CSP
  8. Colours – Flatting
  9. Colours – Rendering

And, that should be it.

If there’s any topic you think needs to be covered, or if you have any specific questions, then let me know!

Simple Copic Marker

Some time ago I created a simple copic marker brush in Clip Studio Paint (actually it was so long ago it was probably in Manga Studio). It was a fun little resource when linked to this set of colours of the standard copic colour set for Clip Studio Paint.

Of course, you do these things and entirely forget about them, and then several years later you delete them only to discover people still need them, so my apologies for that. Here – thanks to the archiving of the wayback machine – is the zip file for for the brush.

Uncompress the zip file and drag the .SUT file in to your installation of Clip Studio Paint, or go marker tool submenu and select “import sub tool” to import the file.